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Posted: February 16, 2014 in Uncategorized

“Boasting”

Posted: October 11, 2012 in Uncategorized

“Boasting” by Lecrae (featuring Anthony Evans) lyrics and song below:

If this life has anything to gain at all
I count it lost if I can’t hear you, feel you, ’cause I need you
Can’t walk this earth alone
I recognize I am not my own, so before I fall
I need to hear you, feel you, as I live to make my boast in you alone

Verse 1:
With every breath I take, with every heart beat,
Sunrise or the moon lights in the dark street
Every glance, every dance, every note of a song
It’s all a gift undeserved that I shouldn’t have known
Every day that I lie, every moment I covet
I’m deserving to die, I’m just earning your judgment
Ah, without the cross there’s only condemnation
If Jesus wasn’t executed there’s no celebration
So in times that are good, in times that are bad
For any times that I’ve had it all I will be glad
And I will boast in the cross, I boast in my pains
I will boast in the sunshine, boast in his reign (rain)
What’s my life if it’s not praising you
Another dollar in my bank account of vain pursuit, I do
That count my life as any value or precious at all
Let me finish my race, let me answer my call

Verse 2:
Tomorrow’s never promised, but it is we swear
Think we holding our own, just a fist full of air
God has never been obligated to give us life
If we fought for our rights, we be in hell tonight
Mere sinners own nothing but a fierce hand
We never loved him we pushed away his pierced hands
I rejected his love, grace, kindness, and mercy
Dying of thirst, yet, willing to die thirsty
Eternally worthy, how could I live for less?
Patiently you turn my heart away from selfishness
I volunteer for your sanctifying surgery
I know the spirits purging me of everything that’s hurting me
Remove the veil from my darkened eyes
So now every morning I open Your Word and see the Son (Sun) rise
I hope in nothin’, boast in nothin’, only in your sufferin’
I live to show your glory, dyin’ to tell your story

Bridge:
Glory was solely meant for you
Doing what no one else could do
With all I have to give, (With all I have to give)
I’ll use my life, I’ll use my lips (My Lips, Yaaa)
I’ll only glory in your Word
What gift to me I don’t deserve
I’ll live in such a way that it reflects to you, my Praise

For more information or to hear more songs go to Reach Records

“It Is Well With My Soul”

Posted: October 5, 2012 in Uncategorized

VERSE 1
When peace like a river attendeth my way
When sorrows like sea billows roll
Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to say
It is well, it is well with my soul

CHORUS
It is well with my soul
It is well with my soul
It is well, it is well with my soul

VERSE 2
Though Satan should buffet, though trials should come
Let this blest assurance control
That Christ has regarded my helpless estate
And has shed His own blood for my soul

VERSE 3
My sin, oh the bliss of this glorious thought
My sin, not in part, but the whole
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul

VERSE 4
And Lord, haste the day when my faith shall be sight
The clouds be rolled back as a scroll
The trump shall resound, and the Lord shall descend
Even so, it is well with my soul

Below is the hymn recorded at the 2008 Together for the Gospel conference. Also check out this background information on the life of Horatio Spafford and the circumstances that led him to write this hymn.

This morning we spent our fourth week in the book of James looking at verses 13-18 of chapter 1. In this passage James writes about how we should view and understand trials and temptations.

In verse 12 James tells us that those who love God understand the purpose of His testing. Borrowing some of the language he used previously in verses 1-4, James tells us here that the one who “remains under” trials faithfully is blessed. He is not blessed because of how fun or enjoyable trials are, but because “when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life.” This reward has been promised to those who love God.

In verses 13-15 James tells us that those who love God understand the sinful nature of man. One of the byproducts of trials is temptation, that is, when things are difficult in our lives we are tempted to doubt the goodness of God and take matters into our own hands to resolve our situation, even if that means sinning. In these times it is easy to blame God for temptations when in reality the temptation originates in us. We are tempted to sin when we are lured away by our own lusts and desires which produces sin, which produces death. We must understand our true sinful nature because if we fail to do so we will likely resent God and fail to deal with the real problem

In verses 16-18 James tells us that those who love God understand His goodness. While we are the source of sin and temptation in our lives, God is the source of all things good. He himself is good as evidenced in his creation. He does not change from day to day like we do. He is the same yesterday, today and forever. His ultimate goodness is seen in verse 18 as we see that he is the one who gave us birth through the gospel, something we never could have experienced without his grace and mercy, and that he did so “of his own will.” No one compelled God to save us, no one twisted the arm of the almighty. He had the free choice to let us perish for our rebellion against him or to save us and we rejoice today knowing that he chose the latter.

Trials come into our lives often and when they do we are tempted to sin against God and even blame him for what we have done. We must recognize his good purpose in testing. We must understand our own sinful nature. And we must understand God’s goodness in all things.

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website

This morning we spent our third week in the book of James looking at verses 9-11 of chapter 1. In this passage James writes about the perspective we need to have in times of poorness and richness alike.

In verse 9 James says that the low will be made high. There are some people in this life who are in “lowly” circumstances. The term James uses is not the common term that simply refers to poorness, but rather a term simply meaning low. This term is more encompassing of the situation the original readers find themselves in. Having been dispersed from their homeland they were most likely not just poor but also low in the overall structure of society. They did not have much power or influence and were  easily taken advantage of.

James says that believers who find themselves in a lowly position should boast in their high position. The high position obviously does not refer to their place in society but rather their position in the kingdom of God. James 2:5 says “Listen, my beloved brothers, has not God chosen those who are poor in the world to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom, which he has promised to those who love him?” Those who have placed their faith in Christ but find themselves in humble circumstances on this earth should boast not in their marginalization in the world but in the exhalation that is coming in the next life in their position as heirs to the kingdom of God.

In verses 10-11 James says that the high will be made low. The terms “let him boast” and “brother” carry over into verse 10 from verse 9 so that the rich brother, the one who finds himself in a high position in this life should boast in his “lowness”. Rather than boasting in his wealth and success, as is the temptation for many who are rich in this life, the rich believer should boast in the fact that while his riches and success will fade away the word of God, the true source of his hope, lasts forever.

Believers who are rich and believers who are poor should boast, not in their current circumstances but in the future grace that is coming for all those who have put their faith in Christ.

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website

This morning we spent our second week in the book of James looking at verses 5-8 of chapter 1. In this passage James writes about our need for wisdom from God.

In verse 5 James says that the need for biblical wisdom is evident in our lives. He ends verse 4 with the word lacking (the last word to appear in the Greek text) and then begins verse 5 with the phrase “if any of you lacks wisdom.” By using the same term in both verses and using it so closely together James appears to be drawing a contrast between the ideal scenario of “lacking in nothing” in verse 4 and our actual scenario of currently lacking wisdom.

Though James does not define wisdom in these verses, he does so in chapter 3 where it is seen as not just knowledge but also the living out of that knowledge. Playing off the concept of wisdom seen in the OT (particularly the book of Proverbs) wisdom should be seen in this text as something that is lived out and acted out not simply possessed in theory.

Also in verse 5 James says that the search for biblical wisdom reveals the character of God. James says that God “gives generously to all without reproach.” This tells us two things. First, God alone possesses wisdom for he is the only one believers are to seek in order to gain it. This is seen clearly throughout scripture as God is called the one to whom belongs wisdom and might (Daniel 2:20). Secondly we are told that God is not one to lord it over us or take advantage of our need for something. He is not looking for an opportunity to deny us but is eager to give wisdom to those who ask in faith.

Finally in verses 6-8 James says that the possession of biblical wisdom requires belief in God’s character. The reason that we are lacking wisdom is not that God is unwilling to give it, but rather that we are unwilling to ask for it in faith. James says that those who doubt the character of God, who doubt that he is who he says he is and that he will do what he has said he will do, are like a wave tossed by the sea.

Biblical wisdom is something that all believers need. However it is a need that God is eager to fill if we will just ask in faith, not doubting the source of all wisdom.

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website

This morning we spent our first week in the book of James looking at verses 1-4 of chapter 1. In this passage James answers the basic question of “is it worth it” that is, is there anything to gain from the trials we go through in life? Is there any purpose in the difficulties we face? James answers these questions with a resounding yes!

After introducing himself and his audience in verse 1, James takes verse 2 to say that not only are trials worth it, but that they should be considered “pure joy”. James is not telling his readers how to feel about trials but rather how to think about them or understand them. He is not attempting to make an argument as to why  trials come about in our life but rather how we should respond whenever they happen to come. His command to “consider it pure joy” applies “whenever you meet trials of various kinds.”

In verse 3 James tells us that the testing of our faith produces “steadfastness” or “perseverance”. This testing does not give us the ability to escape trials and live a life of ease but rather it gives us the ability to “remain under” the trials that will inevitably come up at different points in our life.

James finishes the thought in verse 4 by saying that we must let that “steadfastness” or “perseverance” have its full work. That is, simply going through a trial does not necessarily do anything. Rather we must go through a trial the right way, trusting God and accepting his sovereign purposes in our life rather than cursing him and seeking an exit from our difficulties at any cost. The result of letting perseverance have its full work is that we will be “mature and complete, lacing in nothing”. The ultimate goal of trials is our ongoing sanctification, the process of being conformed more and more to the image of God

Trials should be seen as pure joy not because they are fun to experience but because of the opportunity to grow in Christ-likeness, a process that should be ongoing in the life of all believers, ultimately leading to the day where we will see God face to face.

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website

This morning we had a guest speaker, Micah Jones, from Belcroft Bible Church. He preached on “God’s Picture of Perfect Peace” from Isaiah 2:1-5.

(Note: We apologize for some audio recording problems during this sermon. There will be a few points when Micah’s voice will be present but difficult to hear)

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website

This morning we had a guest speaker, Roderick Montgomery, from Hope Bible Church. He preached on “The Marks Of An Excellent Church” from 1 Thessalonians 4:1-5:22.

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website

This morning we spent our sixth and final week in Hebrews 11, focusing on verses 32-38.

This section of scripture gives us a snapshot of the various potential outcomes for people of faith. These verses describe several distinct results but verse 33 tells us that all these people acted “by faith”. That is, those who experienced success or victory in life did so by faith. On the flip side those who experienced pain, discomfort and even martyrdom also did so by faith. In the life of a Christian no one outcome is guaranteed. God will work through the success of some, the pain of others and everything else in between. We shouldn’t assume that things always happen to us simply as a direct result of our actions. Rather we should simply seek to be faithful and follow God through the good and the bad.

Verses 32-35a show us that sometimes people of faith are successful. They conquered kingdoms, enforced justice, obtained promises, became mighty in war and put foreign armies to flight. While not everything in life went well for this group, their life was marked by and large by success rather than failure.

In the same set of verses We see those who came through trials relatively unscathed. They stopped the mouths of lions, quenched the power of fire, escaped the edge of the sword and were made strong out of weakness. This group went through some difficulties in life, but rather than face the consequences of their faithfulness to God, they were delivered from pain and suffering.

In verses 35b-38 we see the final group of believers who felt the pain. they were tortured, refusing to accept release, so that they might rise again to a better life. They suffered mocking and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword. They went about in skins of sheep and goats, destitute, afflicted, mistreated- wandering about in deserts and mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth. Those who found themselves in this group did not suffer because of their sins, but rather they went through all these difficulties “by faith”. While none of us want or prefer suffering in this life, sometimes that is simply our lot.

People of faith follow God through the good and the bad

Below is the audio, please feel free to post a comment or ask a question below. If you would like more contact info please visit our website